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Do I Need a Medigap Policy?

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Medigap supplemental policies are sold by private insurance companies and either fully or partially cover cost-sharing aspects of Medicare Part A (hospital coverage) and Part B (outpatient care). However, one thing that feeds into the premium cost is how the insurer “rates” its Medigap policies, explains  CNBC’s recent article entitled “A ‘Medigap’ policy picks up some costs that Medicare won’t. Here are tips for choosing one.”

In fact, some insurers will provide discounts for two policies in the same household. Therefore, you would want to understand a carrier’s premium rating system, its claims history and the caliber of its customer service department. Don’t buy a policy just based on the cost.

About 62.3 million people, most of whom are 65 or older, are enrolled in Medicare. About a third of beneficiaries opt to get their Part A (hospital coverage) and Part B (outpatient care) benefits through an Advantage Plan (Part C). Those plans offer out-of-pocket limits and frequently will have dental and vision coverage or other benefits. They also typically provide Part D prescription drug coverage. The rest use original Medicare — Parts A and B — and, typically, add a standalone Part D prescription plan. In that scenario, unless you have some other type of coverage (i.e., employer-sponsored insurance or you get extra coverage from Medicaid), the option for lowering your out-of-pocket costs is a Medigap policy.

When you initially enroll in Part B, you have six months to buy a Medigap policy without an insurance company reviewing your health history and deciding whether to insure you. After this period ends, depending on the specifics of your situation and the state in which you reside, you may have to go through underwriting.

The reasons to buy a Medigap plan are different for each individual. A big difference in premiums can come from how they are “rated.” If you know this, it may help you to appreciate what may happen to your premium in the future. There are some insurers’ Medigap policies that are “community-rated.” This means everyone who buys a particular policy pays the same rate, no matter what their age. Other plans are based on “attained age.” That means the rate you receive at purchase, is based upon your age and will go up as you get older. A few others use “issue age,” where the rate will stay the same as you age, but it’s based on your age at the time you purchase the policy.

Your premiums also may jump from year to year due to other factors, like inflation and insurer increases.

Remember to see if there’s a household discount. Many insurers have this, and it can save 3% to 14%.

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Reference: CNBC (June 15, 2020) “A ‘Medigap’ policy picks up some costs that Medicare won’t. Here are tips for choosing one”

Suggested Key Terms: Elder Law Attorney, Medicare, Medigap